Advertisement

Joint Studies of Event-Related Brain Potentials and 99mTc-Hexamethyl-propyleneamineoxime SPECT on Sensory-Guided Hand Tracking

  • W. Lang
  • M. Lang
  • I. Podreka
  • E. Suess
  • C. Müller
  • M. Steiner
  • L. Deecke
Conference paper

Abstract

In humans, measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and electrophysiological recordings offer the possibility of directly studying the neuronal activity of brain structures and of establishing functional-anatomical relations in behavioral tasks. Current trends in topographical studies of brain functions include the use of scalp-recorded slow negative potential shifts (SPs), which occur time-locked to the performance of cognitive or motor tasks. The reason for this is the physiolgical significance of slow, surface-negative cortical potential shifts as an indicator of cortical activation. The spatial resolution of scalp-recorded SPs is limited, but sufficient, for instance, to separate the neuronal activity of localized cortical structures which are involved when preparing motor performance of different parts of the body (Boschert and Deecke 1986). In the present experiments, various tasks on sensory-guided hand tracking have been investigated. There were two points of interest: (1) Are there modality-specific effects on performance-related potential shifts? (2) What are the effects on SPs when changing variables of motor output by establishing conflicting response selection paradigms? These questions have been investigated by measuring both SPs and rCBF.

Keywords

Visual Tracking Hemispheric Asymmetry Joint Study Stimulus Direction Brain SPECT 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Boschert J, Deecke L (1986) Cerebral potentials preceding voluntary toe, knee and hip movements and their vectors in human precentral gyrus. Brain Res 376:175–179PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Deecke L, Kornhuber HH, Lang W, Lang M, Schreiber H (1985) Timing function of the frontal cortex in sequential motor and learning tasks. Hum Neurobiol 4:143–154PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Lang W, Lang M, Kornhuber A, Deecke L, Kornhuber HH (1983) Human cerebral potentials and visuomotor learning. Pflugers Arch 399:342–344PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Lang W, Lang M, Heise B, Deecke L, Kornhuber HH (1984) Brain potentials related to voluntary hand tracking: motivation and attention. Hum Neurobiol 3:235–240PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Lang W, Lang M, Kornhuber A, Kornhuber HH (1986) Electrophysiological evidence for right frontal lobe dominance in spatial visuomotor learning. Arch Ital Biol 124:1–13PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Lang W, Lang M, Podreka I, Suess E, Müller C, Steiner M, Deecke L (1987) Functional imaging (Tc 99m-HMPAO-SPECT) and movement related potentials in a joint study of human visuomotor learning. J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 7 (Suppl 1): S 314Google Scholar
  7. Podreka I, Suess E, Goldenberg G, Steiner M, Brücke T, Müller C, Lang W, Neirinckx RD, Deecke L (1987) Initial experience with Tc-99m-hexamethylprophyleneamineoxime (Tc-99m-HM-PAO) brain SPECT. J Nucl Med 28:1657–1666PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Lang
    • 1
  • M. Lang
    • 2
  • I. Podreka
    • 1
  • E. Suess
  • C. Müller
    • 1
  • M. Steiner
    • 1
  • L. Deecke
    • 1
  1. 1.Neurologische KlinikUniversität WienWienAustria
  2. 2.Neurologische KlinikUniversität UlmUlmFederal Republic of Germany

Personalised recommendations