Preoperative Care of Adult Patients Chosen for Liver Transplantation

  • G. Brunner
  • W. Lauchart
  • B. Ringe
  • H. Freyberger
  • R. Pichlmayr
Conference paper

Abstract

Liver transplantation has found its place as an accepted therapy in end-stage liver disease. It is no longer considered an experimental procedure [6, 9, 10–12]. However, the chance of immediate and long-term survival is still far from ideal. Low-risk and high-risk (elective and non-elective) patients are offered to the transplant surgeon, and it is well known that the best results are achieved in the elective or low-risk patients [9, 11, 12] (Fig.l). Therefore surgeons urge the internist to send patients earlier. The internist, however, tends to keep the patient on conservative regimes as long as possible before he makes such a far-reaching decision. This often results in a situation where the patient becomes an extremely high operative risk.

Keywords

Hepatitis Filtration Fractionation Peri Aldosterone 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Brunner
    • 1
  • W. Lauchart
    • 1
  • B. Ringe
    • 1
  • H. Freyberger
    • 1
  • R. Pichlmayr
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Abdominal and Transplant Surgery, Department of Psychosomatic MedicineMedizinische HochschuleHannoverFederal Republic of Germany

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