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Ambulatory blood pressure — direct and indirect

  • B. A. Gould
  • R. S. Hornung
  • P. M. M. Cashman
  • E. B. Raftery
Conference paper

Abstract

Blood pressure is a continually varying parameter which cannot be characterized by the occasional outpatient (office) indirect recording. Serial measurements throughout the day and night are required. Such measurements may be obtained by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring; however, these methods have not been assessed for accuracy in operation away from the hospital environment. We have used the Oxford system for intra-arterial ambulatory blood pressure monitoring as the standard against which the indirect techniques could be compared. We evaluated self-recorded blood pressures, the Remler M2000, and the Avionics 1978 pressurometer. In addition we have assessed how well self-recorded blood pressures (as measured by epidemologists) on awakening and on going to bed reflected the daytime blood pressures. We have also compared the recorded reductions during trials with anti-hypertensive agents.

Keywords

Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Frequency Histogram Home Blood Pressure Clinic Blood Pressure Daytime Blood Pressure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dr. Dietrich Steinkopff Verlag GmbH & Co. KG, Darmstadt 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. A. Gould
    • 1
  • R. S. Hornung
    • 1
  • P. M. M. Cashman
    • 1
  • E. B. Raftery
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cardiology and Divisions of Bioengineering and Clinical SciencesNorthwick Park Hospital and Clinical Research CentreHarrow, MiddlesexUK

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