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Functional evaluation of allografts by non-invasive techniques

  • Armin Wessel
  • P. E. Lange
  • J. H. Bürsch
  • H. H. Sievers
  • A. C. Yankah
  • A. Bernhard
  • P. H. Heintzen
Conference paper

Abstract

Heart valve replacement aims to substitute malfunctioning valves by devices with perfect haemodynamic profiles. Although there is some evidence that promising results in this field may be achieved by allograft transplantation (1,5) follow-up remains mandatory to answer the question “What have you really done?” in the individual patient.

Keywords

Allograft Transplantation Pulmonary Insufficiency Regurgitant Fraction Heart Valve Replacement Valve Motion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dr. Dietrich Steinkopff Verlag GmbH & Co. KG, Darmstadt 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Armin Wessel
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • P. E. Lange
    • 1
  • J. H. Bürsch
    • 1
  • H. H. Sievers
    • 2
  • A. C. Yankah
    • 2
  • A. Bernhard
    • 2
  • P. H. Heintzen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Paediatric Cardiology and Biomedical EngineeringUniversity of KielGermany
  2. 2.Department of Cardiovascular SurgeryUniversity of KielGermany
  3. 3.Department of Paediatric CardiologyKiel 1Germany

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