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Consensus Proposal for 5-HT3 Antagonists in the Prevention of Acute Emesis Related to Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy

Dose, Schedule, and Route of Administration
  • David R. Gandara
  • Fausto Roila
  • David Warr
  • Martin J. Edelman
  • Edith A. Perez
  • Richard J. Gralla
Conference paper

Abstract

Selective antagonists to the type 3 serotonin receptor (5-HT3) in combination with corticosteroids are now considered the standard of care for the prevention of emesis from moderately to highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Here we address issues of optimal dose, schedule, and route of administration of four currently available selectable 5-HT3 antagonists. This paper utilizes an evidence-based medicine approach to the literature regarding this class of drugs, emphasizing the results of large, randomized, controlled trials to make formal recommendations concerning optimal use of this important new class of antiemetic agents. We conclude that for each drug there is a plateau in therapeutic efficacy at a definable dose level above which further dose escalation does not improve outcome. Furthermore, a single dose is as effective as multiple doses or continuous infusion, and finally, emerging data demonstrate that the oral route is equally efficacious as the intravenous route of administration, even with highly emetogenic chemotherapy.

Keywords

Emetogenic Chemotherapy Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy Antiemetic Efficacy Acute Emesis Intravenous Ondansetron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • David R. Gandara
  • Fausto Roila
  • David Warr
  • Martin J. Edelman
  • Edith A. Perez
  • Richard J. Gralla

There are no affiliations available

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