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mRNA Decay Machinery in Plants: Approaches and Potential Components

  • James P. Kastenmayer
  • Ambro van Hoof
  • Mark A. Johnson
  • Pamela J. Green
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 104)

Abstract

The abundance of a given mRNA is an important determinant of gene expression. This steady-state level is determined by a combination of the rates of synthesis and degradation of mRNA. Control at the level of message stability is of particular importance for genes whose expression is tightly regulated. Rapid degradation of transcripts in concert with transcriptional repression allows for the level of a transcript in the cytoplasm to be quickly diminished. This precise control of gene expression, afforded by rapid mRNA turnover, likely plays a significant role for plants, since as sessile organisms they must be able to quickly adapt to changes in the environment.

Keywords

mRNA Decay mRNA Turnover Decay Pathway Unstable Transcript Reporter Transcript 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • James P. Kastenmayer
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ambro van Hoof
    • 1
    • 3
  • Mark A. Johnson
    • 1
    • 4
  • Pamela J. Green
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Michigan State University Department of Energy Plant Research LaboratoryMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  3. 3.Department of Molecular and Cellular BiologyUniversity of Arizona/Howard Hughes Medical InstituteTucsonUSA
  4. 4.Department of MicrobiologyMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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