Some News about C.A.MAN Computer Assisted Analysis of Mixtures

  • D. Böhning
  • E. Dietz
Conference paper
Part of the Studies in Classification, Data Analysis, and Knowledge Organization book series (STUDIES CLASS)

Abstract

The paper reviews recent developments in the area of computer assisted analysis of mixture distributions (C.A.MAN). Nonparametric mixture distribution modelling heterogeneity in populations can become the standard model in many biometric applications since it also incorporates the homogeneous situations as a special case. The approach is nonparametric for the mixing distribution including leaving the number of components (subpopulations) of the mixing distribution unknown. Besides developments in theory and algorithms the work focuses in various biometric applications.

Keywords

Eter Candy 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Böhning
    • 1
  • E. Dietz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EpidemiologyFree University BerlinBerlinGermany

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