Virus Transmission by Fungi

  • Jeanne Dijkstra
  • Cees P. de Jager
Part of the Springer Lab Manual book series (SLM)

Abstract

A number of viruses are known to be transmitted by soil-inhabiting fungi. The fungal vectors belong to two classes of obligate parasites: the Chytridiomycetes with the family Olpidiaceae and the Plasmodiophoromycetes with the family Plasmodiophoraceae. The two classes can be distinguished by their zoospores, the former possessing one long flagellum and the latter two flagella of different lengths.

Keywords

Germinate Tray Stopper 

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References

  1. Beemster ABR, De Heij A (1987) A method for detecting Polymyxa betae and beet necrotic yellow vein virus in soil using sugar-beet as a bait plant. Neth J Plant Pathol 93: 91–93CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Dirven JAAM, Peters D (1995) Characteristics of serially produced zoospore suspensions of Polymyxa betae for transmission of beet necrotic yellow vein virus.Phytopathol 143: 537–541Google Scholar
  3. Peters D, Godfrey-Veltman A (1989) Polymyxa betae zoospores as vectors of beet necrotic yellow vein furovirus. Bulletin OEPP/ EPPO 19: 509–515CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jeanne Dijkstra
    • 1
  • Cees P. de Jager
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of VirologyWageningen Agricultural UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands

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