Advertisement

Species Differences in the Metabolic Disposition of Fenofibrate

  • A. Weil
  • J. Caldwell
  • M. Strolin-Benedetti
  • P. Dostert
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

Fenofibrate (isopropyl 4-(p-chlorobenzoyl)phenoxyisobutyrate: Lipanthyl) is a hypolipidaemic agent structurally related to Clofibrate. In view of current concern over the safety-in-use of this class of drug, there is a need for information about their metabolic disposition, in terms of rates and routes of metabolism and excretion and various factors which might influence these, such as species differences, chronic administration and dose dependency. As an adjunct to both the toxicological evaluation and clinical pharmacological investigation of fenofibrate, we now present the results of a study of its fate in rat, dog and man, and some potential influencing factors.

Keywords

Fenofibric Acid Enantiomeric Composition High Performance Liquid Chromatographic Separation Gelatine Capsule Potential Influence Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Caldwell J (1985) Glucuronic acid conjugation in the context of the metabolic conjugation of xenobiotics. In: Matern S, Bock KW, Gerok W (eds) Advance in Glucuronide Conjugation. MTP, Lancaster, UK, pp 7–20Google Scholar
  2. Caldwell J, Hutt AJ (1986) Methodology for the isolation and characterization of conjugates of xenobiotic carboxylic acids. In: Bridges JW, Chasseaud LF (eds) Progress in Drug Metabolism, vol 9. Taylor and Francis, London, pp 11–51Google Scholar
  3. Emudianughe TS, Caldwell J, Sinclair KA, Smith RL (1983) Species differences in the metabolic conjugation of clofibric acid and Clofibrate in laboratory animals and man. Drug Metab Dispos 11:97–102PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Hutt AJ, Fournel S, Caldwell J (1986) The application of a radial compression column to the high performance liquid chromatographic separation of the enantiomers of some 2-arylpropionic acids as their diastereoisomeric R-(+)-1-[naphthen-1-yl]ethylamides. J Chrom 378:409–418CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Sangster SA, Caldwell J, Hutt AJ, Smith RL (1983) The metabolism of p-propylanisole in the rat and mouse and its variation with dose. Fd Chem Toxicol 21:263–271CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Sinclair KA, Caldwell J (1982) The formation of β-glucuronidase resistant glucuronides by the intramolecular rearrangement of glucuronic acid conjugates. Biochem Pharmacol 31:953–957PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Van Breemen R, Fenselau C (1985) Acylation of albumin by 1-O-acyl glucuronides. Drug Metab Dispos 13:318–320PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Van der Waterbeemd H, Testa B, Caldwell J (1986) The influence of conformational factors on the metabolic conjugation of aryloxyacetates. J Pharm Pharmacol 38:14–18PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Weil
    • 1
  • J. Caldwell
    • 1
  • M. Strolin-Benedetti
    • 2
  • P. Dostert
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologySt. Mary’s Hospital Medical SchoolLondonEngland
  2. 2.Laboratoires FournierCentre de RechercheFontaine-les-DijonFrance

Personalised recommendations