Music and Medicine: A Partnership in History

  • R. R. Pratt
  • R. W. Jones

Abstract

The ancient Greeks declared the partnership between music and medicine when they created the god Apollo, whose functions included both the musical and healing arts. Aeschylus (The Suppliant Maidens 263) and Aristophanes (The Plutus 11) refer to the filial relationship of the physician Aesculapius to Apollo — a bond that further strengthened the ties between music and medicine. Meinecke (1948) tells us that even the great Vestals recognized Apollo’s curative powers, and Suetonius noted that the Romans made a similar declaration when the god was adopted by the Emperor Augustus.

Keywords

Corn Europe Respiration Trench Arena 

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. R. Pratt
  • R. W. Jones

There are no affiliations available

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