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Physiological Ecology, Disturbance, and Ecosystem Recovery

  • F. A. Bazzaz
  • T. W. Sipe
Part of the Ecological Studies book series (ECOLSTUD, volume 61)

Abstract

During the last decade ecologists seem to have reached a plateau in the attempt to construct a body of theory that is realistic and general enough to serve as a paradigm for their science. The effectiveness of major generalizations concerning such topics as succession, competitive niche divergence, diversity-stability, and r-K selection has been questioned by theoretical disproof or frequent case exception (Harper 1980; Mclntosh 1980a). Few concepts of similar stature have been developed since about 1975, though there are current heavily researched issues (for example, disturbance and plant-herbivore interactions). During this period, we have learned much about the workings of populations, communities, and ecosystems, but we may have leamed even more about the limitations of our traditional ways of viewing and studying ecological interactions (Saarinen 1980; Levin 1981 ; Sait 1983; Strong et al. 1984).

Keywords

Physiological Ecology Patch Dynamic Overstory Tree Ecosystem Recovery Chemical Flux 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. A. Bazzaz
  • T. W. Sipe

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