Mutations which Stabilize myc Transcripts and Enhance myc Transcription in Two Mouse Plasmacytomas

  • S. R. Bauer
  • M. Piechaczyk
  • K. B. Marcu
  • R. P. Nordan
  • M. Potter
  • J. F. Mushinski
Conference paper
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 132)

Abstract

We previously reported preliminary findings concerning two mouse plasmacytomas, TEPC 1165 and TEPC 2027 which make abundant myc transcripts of 3.9 and 4.0 kb, respectively. A Northern blot of poly(A)+ RNAs from TEPC 1165 and TEPC 2027 probed with various portions of the myc gene showed that the first intervening sequence (IVS-I) ends up in mature myc mRNAs of both tumors (Mushinski 1985). All three myc gene exons are present as well.

Keywords

Myeloma Actinomycin Plasmacytomas 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. R. Bauer
    • 1
  • M. Piechaczyk
    • 2
  • K. B. Marcu
    • 3
  • R. P. Nordan
    • 1
  • M. Potter
    • 1
  • J. F. Mushinski
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of GeneticsNational Cancer Institute, National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Biologie MoleculaireUSTLMontpellier, CedexFrance
  3. 3.Biochemistry DepartmentS.U.N.Y. at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA

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