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EBV-Activation of Human B-Lymphocytes

  • P. Åman
  • N. Lewin
  • N. Nordström
  • G. Klein
Conference paper
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 132)

Abstract

The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human herpes virus originally discovered in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines. The virus was found to specifically infect a sub-population of B-lymphocytes. In vitro infected B-cells are transformed into immortalized but non-tumorigenic lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL). The cell lines maintain the genome in a latent form with only limited parts of the genome expressed and none or very little virus is produced (Menezes 1976). Some of the latently transcribed EBV genes code for different components of the EBV nuclear antigens (EBNA) expressed in the cell nucleus of all EBV-carrying cells (Reedman 1973).

Keywords

Germinal Center Lymphoblastoid Cell Line Germinal Center Cell Burkitt Lymphoma Cell Line Cord Blood Lymphocyte 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Åman
    • 1
  • N. Lewin
    • 1
  • N. Nordström
    • 1
  • G. Klein
    • 1
  1. 1.Dep. of Tumor BiologyKarolinska InstituteStockholmSweden

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