Tumors of Newborn NFS/N Mice Infected with Murine Retroviruses Containing Avian v-Myc

  • H. C. MorseIII
  • J. W. Hartley
  • T. N. Fredrickson
  • R. A. Yetter
  • J. L. Cleveland
  • C. Majumdar
  • U. R. Rapp
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 132)

Abstract

Deregulated expression of the c-myc protooncogene appears to contribute to the development of a great variety of neoplasms in different vertebrate species. Perhaps the strongest evidence in support of this view comes from the observations that chickens infected with retroviruses carrying v-myc rapidly develop a spectrum of hematopoietic neoplasms and solid tumors (1). The indications that altered expression of myc is also an important event in the genesis of mammalian tumors are more circumstantial. They center primarily on the observations that aberrant expression of c-myc is associated with the insertion of proviruses in juxtaposition to this gene in T cell lymphomas (2,3) and the regular translocation of c-myc in specific B cell-lineage neoplasms (4,5). Recently, a number of different approaches have been developed to more clearly define the contribution of altered myc expression to neoplasia. These include the development of in vitro transformation assays of nonestablished cell lines (6,7) and studies of transgenic mice bearing myc genes controlled by different regulatory sequences (8,9). Our attempts to understand the role of deregulated myc expression in transformation have focused on a novel system in mice using recombinant murine retroviruses that contain avian v-myc genes. Here we report that newborn NFS/N mice infected with different pseudotypes of these recombinant viruses develop a wide spectrum of hematopoietic and epithelial tumors.

Keywords

Lymphoma Leukemia Adenocarcinoma Recombination Kelly 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. C. MorseIII
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. W. Hartley
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. N. Fredrickson
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. A. Yetter
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. L. Cleveland
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. Majumdar
    • 1
    • 2
  • U. R. Rapp
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of ImmunopathologyNational Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of Viral CarcinogenesisNational Cancer Institute, National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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