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Stimulation for the Treatment of Motor Disorders

  • P. L. Gildenberg
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Applied Neurological Sciences book series (NEUROLOGICAL, volume 4)

Abstract

Stimulation of various parts of the nervous system has been employed for treatment of several motor disorders for some time. Although directly implanted dorsal cord stimulators have been used for the management of pain since 1967 [86], the first published report of the use of spinal cord stimulation in motor disorders did not appear until 1973 when Cook et al. [7] reported improvement in spasticity in patients with multiple sclerosis for whom they were using spinal cord stimulation for pain. It proved to be effective also in subsequent patients without pain [6, 8]. Shortly afterward, Dooley [27, 29] reported beneficial effects in patients with olivopontocerebellar atrophy and Friedreich’s ataxia. The author had the opportunity to report the use of high-frequency dorsal cord stimulation in spasmodic torticollis, in a series which had begun in 1971 [36, 37].

Keywords

Spinal Cord Multiple Sclerosis Cerebral Palsy Spinal Cord Stimulation Motor Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. L. Gildenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.HoustonUSA

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