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Cytochemical Reevaluation of Location and Translocation of Acetylcholinesterase in the Motor End-Plate

  • G. W. Kreutzberg
  • L. Tóth
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Applied Neurological Sciences book series (NEUROLOGICAL, volume 4)

Abstract

The localization of acetylcholinesterase (AChE, EC 3.1.1.7.) in the motor end-plate region has been investigated for almost three decades with light and electron microscopy and with several biochemical techniques. The extensive literature has been critically reviewed by Silver [44] and by Friedenberg and Seligman [17] with special emphasis on the cytochemical methods used. Although data in the literature vary with the different methods used, there is general agreement on the localization of the enzyme in the synaptic cleft of the neuromuscular junction. However, activity related to other structures, e.g., the subneural endoplasmic reticulum, the L-tubules of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, the sarcolemmal T-system, the teloglial Schwann cells, the axolemma and the axonal terminal, have been mentioned occasionally but questioned or even denied by other investigators [2, 3, 7, 12, 27, 49, 50, 51].

Keywords

Schwann Cell Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Basal Lamina Neuromuscular Junction AChE Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. W. Kreutzberg
    • 1
  • L. Tóth
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeuromorphologyMax-Planck-Institute for PsychiatryMunichGermany
  2. 2.Department of AnatomyUniversity Medical SchoolSzegedHungary

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