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Endocrine Treatment of Advanced Breast Cancer

  • H. T. Mouridsen
Part of the ESO Monographs book series (ESO MONOGRAPHS)

Abstract

The various endocrine therapies available in the treatment of breast cancer can be divided into four groups according to their demonstrated or suggested mode of biological action (table 1). These include ablative therapy, inhibitive therapy, additive therapy and competitive therapy.

Keywords

Breast Cancer Endocrine Therapy Metastatic Breast Cancer Advanced Breast Cancer Medroxyprogesterone Acetate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. T. Mouridsen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Oncology ONAThe Finsen InstituteCopenhagenDenmark

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