Flower-shape, Landmark, and Locale Memory in Honeybees

  • James L. Gould

Abstract

There are two main published models for flower-shape memory, for landmark memory, and for locale memory in honey bees. Recent experiments have shed light on the actual mechanisms in each of these cases. Both shape and landmark memory are pictorial, as opposed to parameter-based; they have different resolutions, and so are probably stored separately; neither is eidetic. Locale memory involves a cognitive map rather than just route-specific memory. One of the most interesting questions about learning is how information is processed and stored. This paper will review recent progress in the understanding of how honeybees store and use visual information gathered on foraging flights.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heildelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • James L. Gould
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BiologyPrinceton UniversityPrincetonUSA

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