Adrenoceptor Alterations in Different Tissues in Human and Animal Genetic Hypertension

  • G. Bruschi
  • M. E. Bruschi
  • A. Cavatorta
  • A. Borghetti
Conference paper

Abstract

It is scarcely necessary to stress the importance of adrenoceptor regulation in arterial hypertension. In this disease an altered response to adrenergic agonists has been described in different organs, and particularly in the blood vessels [1–6]. Moreover, antiadrenergic drugs, and particularly alpha and beta blockers, are effective antihypertensive agents.

Keywords

DMSO Norepinephrine Posite Catecholamine Thrombin 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Bruschi
    • 1
  • M. E. Bruschi
    • 1
  • A. Cavatorta
    • 1
  • A. Borghetti
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto di Clinica Medica e NefrologiaUniversità di ParmaParmaItaly

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