Toxic and Protective Effects of Antioxidants in Biomembranes

  • V. Kagan
  • E. Serbinova
  • K. Novikov
  • V. Ritov
  • Y. Kozlov
  • T. Stoytchev
Part of the Archives of Toxicology book series (TOXICOLOGY, volume 9)

Abstract

Natural and synthetic antioxidants (AOs) are widely used as stabilizers of biomembranes against lipid peroxidation (LPO). Natural AOs (tocopherols, ubiquinols) containing hydrocarbon “tails” do not disturb the membrane lipid bilayer. Synthetic AOs devoid of hydrocarbon radicals may perturb the lipid bilayer. It was shown that AOs devoid of hydrocarbon tails (butylated hydroxytoluene, 2,2,5,7,8-pentamethyl-6-hydroxychromane) exerted toxic effects on erythrocyte membranes (induced hemolysis), on sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes (inhibited Ca2+ -transport) and on platelet membranes (initiated Ca2+-dependent aggregation) in vitro. These AOs are the substrates of cytochrome P-450, and underwent oxidative hydroxylation. This suggests that they have short half-life times in biomembranes and in the organism. Antioxidants with hyrocarbon tails, are hydroxylated at very low rates and are slowly excreted. Antioxidants devoid of hydrocarbon tails, are 10–20 fold more potent LPO inhibitors than the corresponding AOs with hydrocarbon tails. The strategy of AOs application for long and short-term stabilization of biomembranes against LPO in vivo is discussed.

Key words

Antioxidants Biomembranes Lipid peroxidation Cytochrome P-450 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Kagan
    • 1
  • E. Serbinova
    • 1
  • K. Novikov
    • 2
  • V. Ritov
    • 2
  • Y. Kozlov
    • 2
  • T. Stoytchev
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of PhysiologyBulgarian Academy of SciencesSofiaBulgaria
  2. 2.Moscow State UniversityMoscowUSSR

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