Advertisement

Intensive Induction and Consolidation Chemotherapy for Adults and Children with Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) Joint AML Trial 1982–1985

  • R. E. Marcus
  • D. Catovsky
  • H. G. Prentice
  • A. C. Newland
  • J. M. Chessells
  • R. F. Stevens
  • I. M. Hann
  • J. M. Goldman
  • A. V. Hoffbrand
  • D. A. G. Galton
Part of the Haematology and Blood Transfusion / Hämatologie und Bluttransfusion book series (HAEMATOLOGY, volume 30)

Abstract

Complete remission (CR) can now be obtained in approximately 75% of patients presenting with AML [1–4]. It is not certain, however, whether subsequent intensive therapy (“consolidation”) will prolong remission duration in patients achieving CR [5]. Furthermore, if consolidation therapy is important, the optimum number of courses remains to be established. The role of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in such patients is not clear. Although it seems that relapse rates after BMT are lower than those observed after chemotherapy, overall survival in the former group may not be superior due to increased deaths following transplant-related complications [6, 7].

Keywords

Complete Remission Bone Marrow Transplantation Acute Myeloid Leukaemia Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Preisler HD, Rustum Y, Henderson ES, et al. (1979) Treatment of acute non-lymphocytic leukemia: use of anthracyclin — cytosine arabinoside induction therapy and comparison of two maintenance regimens. Blood 53: 455–464PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Gale RF, Foon KA, Cline MJ, et al. (1981) Intensive chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukaemia. Ann Intern Med 94: 753–757PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Rai KR, Holland JR, Glidewell OJ, et al. (1981) Treatment of acute myelocytic leukemia: a study by Cancer and Leukemia Group B. Blood 58: 1203–1212PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Weinstein HJ, Mayer RJ, Rosenthal DS, et al. (1983) Chemotherapy for acute myelogenous leukemia in children and adults: VAPA update. Blood 62: 315–319Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Wolff SN, Marion J, Stein RS, et al. (1985) High-dose cytosine arabinoside and daunorubicin as consolidation therapy for acute nonlymphocytic leukemia in first remission: a pilot study. Blood 65: 1407–1411PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Appelbaum FR, Dahlberg S, Thomas ED, et al. (1984) Bone marrow transplantation or che- motherapy after remission induction for adults with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia: a pro- Ann Intern MedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Champlin RE, Ho WG, Gale RP, et al. (1985) Treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia: a prospective controlled trial of bone marrow transplantation versus consolidation chemotherapy. Ann Intern Med 102: 285–291PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. E. Marcus
    • 1
  • D. Catovsky
    • 1
  • H. G. Prentice
    • 2
  • A. C. Newland
  • J. M. Chessells
  • R. F. Stevens
  • I. M. Hann
  • J. M. Goldman
    • 1
  • A. V. Hoffbrand
    • 2
  • D. A. G. Galton
    • 1
  1. 1.MRC Leukaemia UnitHammersmith HospitalLondonUSA
  2. 2.Department of HaematologyRoyal Free HospitalLondonUSA

Personalised recommendations