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Functional Clonal Deletion and Suppression as Complementary Mechanisms in T Lymphocyte Tolerance

  • G. J. V. Nossal
  • B. L. Pike
  • M. F. Good
  • J. F. A. P. Miller
  • J. R. Gamble
Conference paper
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 126)

Abstract

Immunology is frequently the prisoner of its own semantics. Evolution designed an immune system equipped to recognize all foreign antigens, the structure of which it cannot know in advance. The solution involves repertoires of unique clonotypes for both B and T lymphocytes, resulting in a heterogeneity of binding avidities with respect to any given epitope. For the B cell, we now know that as many as 1 in 30 B cells can form antibody leading to lysis of haptenated erythrocytes, suggesting that there are many thousands of ways of forming an antihapten, antibody-combining site. So the question frequently is not, does this B cell recognize that antigen?, but, how well does this B cell recognize that antigen? This much our language can cope with, but when we come to issues like antigen- initiated clonal expansion and differentiation, it is too clumsy to say: This antigen in that dose will trigger two rounds of division in that B cell, with its low-affinity receptors, but ten in that other B cell with its high-affinity receptors. Therefore, we will pose the question and our experimental approaches to it in the simpler yes or no format.

Keywords

Spleen Cell Complementary Mechanism Clonal Deletion Pharyngeal Pouch Tolerant Mouse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. J. V. Nossal
    • 1
  • B. L. Pike
    • 1
  • M. F. Good
    • 1
  • J. F. A. P. Miller
    • 1
  • J. R. Gamble
    • 1
  1. 1.The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Post OfficeThe Royal Melbourne HospitalAustralia

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