Interrelations of Plant Growth Substances, Mineral Nutrition and Crop Yield

  • H. Beringer
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

Synthetic growth regulators are occasionally applied in intensive farming. Most of those used for cereals interfere with gibberellic acid (GA) metabolism, i.e. they reduce shoot length and the risk of yield losses due to lodging. This, however, requires correct timing and dosage and reveals the importance of the plant’s developmental stage for the response to the synthetic growth regulators applied [19].

Keywords

Sugar Potash Chlorocholine 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Beringer
    • 1
  1. 1.Landwirtschaftliche Forschungsanstalt BüntehofHannover 71Germany

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