Experimental Intracerebral Haemorrhage: Intracranial Pressure Changes and Cerebral Blood Flow

  • A. D. Mendelow
  • R. Bullock
  • F. P. Nath
  • A. Jenkins
  • T. Kingman
  • G. M. Teasdale
Conference paper

Abstract

Both spontaneous and traumatic intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) are associated with increased intracranial pressure (ICP) and ultimately with ischaemic brain damage. In patients who have died from subarachnoid haemorrhage Crompton (1964) reported ischaemic brain damage in 70% of autopsies, while Graham et al. (1978) reported a 91% incidence in patients dying after head injury. Although the late manifestations of ischaemic brain damage are common and well documented, the possibility of preventing brain damage depends upon an increased understanding of the early relationships between the bleed, ICP, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the factors responsible for ischaemia. The objective of the present studies was to determine whether or not the primary damage to the brain was a reduction in CBF, and if so to determine the mechanism of its production.

Keywords

Polythene Neurol Nism Halothane Doyle 

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References

  1. Crompton MR (1964) Infarction following the rupture of cerebral berry aneurysms. Brain 87: 263–269CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Graham DI, Adams JH, Doyle D (1978) Ischaemic brain damage in fatal non missile head injuries. J. Neurol. Sci. 39: 213–234Google Scholar
  3. Sakurada O, Kennedy C, Jehle JW, et al. (1978). Measurements of local cerebral blood flow with iodo (14 C) antyprine. Am. J. Physiol. 234: H59–H66PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. D. Mendelow
    • 1
  • R. Bullock
    • 1
  • F. P. Nath
    • 1
  • A. Jenkins
    • 1
  • T. Kingman
    • 1
  • G. M. Teasdale
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity of Glasgow, Southern General Hospital GlasgowScotland, UK

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