Role of Biotechnology in Pesticide Development: Bacillus thuringiensis as an Example

  • David A. Fischhoff
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 13)

Abstract

Bacillus thuringiensis (B.t.) is a spore forming bacterium which produces an insecticidal parasporal crystal upon sporulation. The insecticidal nature of B.t. has been known for several decades. For many years B.t. has served as the basis of successful biological insecticides such as Dipel (Abbot) and Thuricide (Sandoz). To produce these insecticides B.t. is fermented until spores and crystals are produced. The mixture of spores and crystals is then formulated to allow effective application to crop plants. Products such as Dipel have been used effectively on more than 50 species of Lepidopteran pests on over 200 crops (Wilcox et al., 1986).

Keywords

Toxicity Fermentation Corn Bacillus Trypsin 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • David A. Fischhoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Biological SciencesMonsanto Co.ChesterfieldUSA

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