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Conservation Priorities for Seabirds in Italy

  • Giuseppe Bogliani
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 12)

Abstract

Extinction processes have grown dramatically in recent years; a rough estimate of the number of species involved was recently believed to be about 1,000 per year (Anon. 1974, in Myers, 1979). This figure includes many species not yet described by biologists. The loss of a species is not only of subjective concern (e.g. aesthetic, ethical, philosophical), but is also a threat to the potential future welfare of Mankind (Myers, 1979). In order to avoid the extinction of species, or to reduce the threat of extinction, many conservation programmes have been activated by some internationl organizations (e.g. IUCN, WWF, EEC, etc.) as well as by some national organizations (e.g. national and regional governments, local conservation societies).

Keywords

Storm Petrel Continental Level Sandwich Tern Turnover Index Italian Range 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giuseppe Bogliani
    • 1
  1. 1.Dipartimento Biologia AnimaleUniversity of PaviaItaly

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