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Selection for Fast and Slow Mating Lines in the Medfly and Analysis of Elements of Courtship Behaviour

  • D. J. Harris
  • R. J. Wood
  • S. E. R. Bailey
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 11)

Abstract

The response to selection by single pair (SP) and mass (M) methods was greater in slow lines. SP females determined mating activity, but in M lines both sexes did so. M males started wing vibration at a closer distance and proceeded to flapping sooner than SP males. Behavioural indices showed SP fast and M slow males used pheromone signalling to slow females more often than did controls.

Keywords

Single Pair Courtship Behaviour Control Pairing Common Letter Successful Copulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. Harris
    • 1
  • R. J. Wood
    • 1
  • S. E. R. Bailey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyManchester UniversityManchesterEngland

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