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Secretion and Cleavage of Sucrose by Wheat: A System of Chemotactic Attraction and Nitrogenase Induction in Azospirillum Lipoferum

  • D. Hess
  • D. Heinrich
  • J. Kemmner
  • S. Jekel

Summary

The interactions between spring wheat and Azospirillum lipoferum were studied under test tube conditions. Sucrose was secreted by wheat roots and cleaved by an invertase, which had been released from wheat roots as well. Excretion and subsequent cleavage of sucrose by wheat proved to be a main driving force in associate symbiosis:
  1. 1.

    Sucrose, fructose, and glucose are attracting Azospirilla to wheat roots. The chemotactic potential was increased by sucrose cleavage.

     
  2. 2.

    Fructose, and to a smaller extent glucose, provided energy sources for bacterial growth and dinitrogen fixation.

     
  3. 3.

    Fructose, and to a smaller extent glucose, induced bacterial nitrogenase activity even on media with nitrogenase repressing levels of N substances. Nitrogenase induction involved bacterial gene activation.

     

Keywords

Sucrose excretion sucrose cleavage chemotactic attraction nitrogenase induction carbohydrate utilization association wheat — Azospirillum 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Hess
    • 1
  • D. Heinrich
    • 1
  • J. Kemmner
    • 1
  • S. Jekel
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für PflanzenphysiologieUniversität HohenheimStuttgart 70Germany

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