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Correlation Between Computerized EEG and Clinical Findings in Patients with Senile Dementia

  • A. Moglia
  • A. Arrigo
  • A. Battaglia
  • G. Sacchetti

Abstract

Over the past decades, with the “progressive aging of the population”, increased attention has been given to the pathology associated with advancing age and characterized not so much or not only by vascular disorders but, more importantly, by the impairment of neuronal and metabolic functions [6, 24].

Keywords

Senile Dementia Beta Frequency Cerebral Pathology Neurophysiological Correlation Progressive Aging 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Moglia
    • 1
  • A. Arrigo
    • 1
  • A. Battaglia
    • 2
  • G. Sacchetti
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Clinical NeurophysiologyUniversity of PaviaPaviaItaly
  2. 2.Medical Department, Pharmaceutical DivisionFarmitalia Carlo ErbaMilanoItaly

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