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Methodological Approach to the Clinical Evaluation of Nootropic Drugs

  • G. Dolce
  • V. Cecconi
  • A. Zamponi
  • R. Zylberman
  • L. Maggi
  • A. Battaglia

Abstract

Numerous drugs have been suggested and employed for the treatment of cerebral insufficiency. They were variously classified without any indication of their particular features. Nowadays, nootropics have to be added to activators, neurody-namic drugs, cerebral protectors, psychoanaleptics, vasoactivators and metabo-lizers. From a theoretical point of view, a nootropic substance is likely to improve intellective functions even in absence of mental deterioration. From a clinical standpoint, we prefer to define the nootropic effect of a drug as “the therapeutic capacity of improving impaired brain performance following various neuro-pathological or age-related processes”.

Keywords

Cognitive Training Motor Recovery Ined Variable Digit Symbol Substitution Test Digit Symbol Substitution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Dolce
    • 1
  • V. Cecconi
    • 1
  • A. Zamponi
    • 1
  • R. Zylberman
    • 1
  • L. Maggi
    • 1
  • A. Battaglia
    • 2
  1. 1.San Giovanni Battista Hospital — ACI SmomRomaItaly
  2. 2.Medical Department, Pharmaceutical DivisionFarmitalia Carlo ErbaMilanoItaly

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