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Exercise-Induced Changes in Gonadotropin Secretion Patterns: A Possible Mechanism for Menstrual Cycle Disturbances

  • H. A. Keizer
Conference paper

Abstract

The hormone concentrations in peripheral blood fluctuate at different frequencies. In principle, three types of secretion patterns may be distinguished:
  1. 1.

    Low-frequency changes, which represent changes in the mean daily plasma hormone concentration during the menstrual cycle;

     
  2. 2.

    High-frequency changes, superimposed on the low-frequency changes. To date, it is well recognized that many hormones, including luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol (E2, prolactin (PRL), and progesterone (P) are secreted in a characteristic pulsatile pattern (YEN et al. 1972a and b; SANTEN and BARDIN 1973; KORENMAN and SHERMAN 1973; LENTON et al. 1978, 1979; BACKSTROM et al. 1982);

     
  3. 3.

    Changes of intermediate frequency, called "diurnal" or "circadian" because they recur every 24 h; in women, diurnal changes are found for LH, FSH, E2, and PRL (BACKSTROM et al. 1982).

     

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. A. Keizer

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