Trees I pp 130-273 | Cite as

Fruit Trees

  • Ph. Druart
  • R. Gruselle
  • J. Ivanička
  • A. PreŤová
  • F. Hammerschlag
  • R. M. Skirvin
  • M. Kouider
  • H. Joung
  • S. S. Korban
  • S. Singha
  • M. Barlass
  • K. G. M. Skene
  • R. E. Litz
  • S. S. Cronauer
  • A. D. Krikorian
  • E. Rugini
Part of the Biotechnology in Agriculture and Forestry book series (AGRICULTURE, volume 1)

Abstract

Plum tree is considered a hardy plant, and a large number of species and hybrids spread all over the world characterize a great adaptation to various soils and climates. It seems to go back more than 2000 years (Gautier 1977). The plum trees cultivated today belong to the section Euprunus, and Prunus domestica group includes the largest number of varieties. For some years, Italy, Spain and France have cultivated more precocious Japanese varieties of the Prunus salicina group. In the Prunus cerasifera group there is the myrobalan stock. The other stocks, as well as mirabelle belong to Prunus insititia group. Plum is essentially used in the processing industry: drying, distillation, jam, syrup, fruit juice, etc. The consumption of the table plum is not significant. The world plum production amounts to 5 to 6 thousand metric tons annually (Table 1), 55 to 65% of which originate in Europe. The largest producers are the USSR, Rumania, and the USA. Yugoslavia, formerly the leading world producer, has reduced its production to about half of its capacity, during the last ten years (532 million t in 1980 instead of 1002 million t in 1963–1971). Southern European countries produce cv. Quetsche, almost exclusively for the industry. The exploitation there is not very intensive, but the production is more than the half european production. In Spain and Italy, orchards have been modernized, cultures are irrigated, and production is mainly export oriented.

Keywords

Glycine Glutamine Charcoal Pectin Inositol 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ph. Druart
  • R. Gruselle
    • 1
  • J. Ivanička
  • A. PreŤová
    • 2
  • F. Hammerschlag
    • 3
  • R. M. Skirvin
    • 4
  • M. Kouider
    • 5
  • H. Joung
    • 4
  • S. S. Korban
    • 4
  • S. Singha
    • 6
  • M. Barlass
  • K. G. M. Skene
    • 7
  • R. E. Litz
    • 8
  • S. S. Cronauer
  • A. D. Krikorian
    • 9
  • E. Rugini
    • 10
  1. 1.Agronomy Research Centre, Research StationGemblouxBelgium
  2. 2.Fruit Research Breeding StationBojniceCzechoslovakia
  3. 3.Tissue Culture and Molecular Genetics LaboratoryUSDA/ARSBeltsvilleUSA
  4. 4.Department of HorticultureUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA
  5. 5.Attache de RecherchesMission ScientifiqueParisFrance
  6. 6.Division of Plant and Soil SciencesWest Virginia UniversityMorgantownUSA
  7. 7.Division of Horticultural ResearchCSIROAdelaideAustralia
  8. 8.Institute of Food and Agricultural SciencesUniversity of FloridaHomesteadUSA
  9. 9.Department of Biochemistry, Division of Biological SciencesState University of NewYork at Stony BrookNew YorkUSA
  10. 10.Centro di Studio per la Olivicoltura CNRBorgo XX GiugnoPerugiaItaly

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