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Characterization of Human Health Risks

Risk Characterization Working Group
  • Carl O. Schulz
  • David R. Brown
  • Ian C. Munro
Part of the Environmental Toxin Series book series (TOXIN SERIES, volume 3)

Abstract

In order to characterize the human health risks of exposure to a chemical substance or mixture of substances, it is necessary to identify the health effects that the substance(s) cause(s) in exposed humans (hazard evaluation) and then determine a quantitative relationship between the specific exposure and the incidence or severity of the effects (dose-response characterization). Ideally, information from studies of exposed human populations is used for risk characterization. In practice, in the absence of adequate data on human health effects, information from studies in experimental animals is used. This is especially true for dose-response characterization.

Keywords

Body Burden Human Health Risk Human Adipose Tissue Porphyria Cutanea Tarda Risk Characterization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl O. Schulz
    • 1
  • David R. Brown
    • 2
  • Ian C. Munro
    • 3
  1. 1.University of South CarolinaUSA
  2. 2.Connecticut Department of Health ServicesUSA
  3. 3.F.R.C. Path., Canadian Center for ToxicologyCanada

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