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Introduction: The Psychology of Time

  • John A. Michon
  • Janet L. Jackson

Abstract

Time is a fascinating subject!This much is evident from the innumerable arguments raised in the course of twenty-five centuries of philosophical debate. The presocratic philosophers already showed a lively interest in the nature of time and formulated many of the questions that are still of fundamental concern to humankind. Is time real or an artifact of the way mortals look at things? Is time a sense impression or is it an idea, that is, a mental construction forced upon us by the innate properties of our minds? The mind-boggling complexities emerging from this debate can be traced in numerous disguises through the ages, up to the present day, and quite a few authors have done admirable jobs by summarizing the different positions or by providing anthologies of indispensable primary sources (e.g. Sivadjian, 1938; Whitrow, 1960; Smart, 1964; Gale, 1968; Sherover, 1975).

Keywords

Temporal Information Time Perception Biological Rhythm Psychophysical Function Duration Discrimination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • John A. Michon
  • Janet L. Jackson

There are no affiliations available

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