Analytical Cybernetics of Spider Navigation

  • Horst Mittelstaedt

Abstract

The navigation of the funnel web spider is a complex behavioral performance: it depends on the animal’s motivation, which in turn changes seasonally, diurnally, and by dint of various vicissitudes including the consequences of its own success of failure; it uses allothetic sources of spatial information such as the overall light distribution, specifically the sun and the polarization pattern of the sky, the structure and the inclination of the web, as well as idiothetic sources such as stored records of the animal’s own movements provided by proprioceptors or efference copies (see also Görner and Claas, Chap. XIV, this Vol.); it employs large arrays of receptors and effectors connected by a central nervous organization which might lead to perfect navigation, were it not for the everpresent influence of noise at all levels of the system.

Keywords

Straw Autocorrelation Sine Azimuth Dinates 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bartels M (1929) Sinnesphysiologische und psychologische Untersuchung an der Trichterspinne Agelena labyrinthica (Cl.) Z Vergl Physiol 10:527–593Google Scholar
  2. Bartels M, Baltzer F (1928) Über Orientierung und Gedächtnis der Netzspinne Agelena labyrinthica. Rev Suisse Zool 35:247–258Google Scholar
  3. Barth FG, Seyfarth EA (1971) Slit sense organs and kinesthetic orientation. Z Vergl Physiol 74:306–328CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Domfeldt K (1972) Die Bedeutung der Haupt- und Nebenaugen für das Heimfindevermögen der Trichterspinne Agelena labyrinthica mit Hilfe einer Lichtquelle. Dissertation, Freie Univ BerlinGoogle Scholar
  5. Domfeldt K (1975a) Die Bedeutung der Haupt- und Nebenaugen für die photomenotaktische Orientierung der Trichterspinne Agelena labyrinthica (Cl.). Z Tierpsychol 38:113–153CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Dornfeldt K (1975b) Eine Elementaranalyse des Wirkungsgefüges des Heimfïndevermögens der Trichterspinne Agelena labyrinthica (Cl.). Z Tierpsychol 38:267–293CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Görner P (1958) Die optische und kinästhetische Orientierung der Trichterspinne Agelena labyrinthica (Cl.). Z Vergl Physiol 41:111–153CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Görner P (1985) Goal orientation without directional cues in the funnel-web spider Agelena labyrinthica Clerck. (in press)Google Scholar
  9. Kroll C (1983) Zur Theorie der Navigation durch Wegintegration: Lösungen im Ortsfrequenz-und im Winkelbereich bei gegebenem Leistungskatalog. Diplomarbeit, Tech Univ MünchenGoogle Scholar
  10. Kurth B (1974) Die Orientierung der Trichterspinne Agelena labyrinthica (Cl.) nach Parametern des Netzes. Diplomarbeit, Freie Univ BerlinGoogle Scholar
  11. Manert M (1983) Rechnergestützte Untersuchungen über das Verhalten der Trichterspinne bei der Suche der Warte nach Hochheben bei Dunkelheit. Diplomarbeit, Tech Univ MünchenGoogle Scholar
  12. Mittelstaedt H (1978) Kybernetische Analyse von Orientierungsleistungen. In: Hauske G, Butenand E (eds) Kybernetik 1977. Oldenbourg, München Wien, pp 144–195Google Scholar
  13. Mittelstaedt H (1982) Einführung in die Kybernetik des Verhaltens. In: Hoppe W, Lohmann W, Markl H, Ziegler H (eds) Biophysik. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, pp 822–830Google Scholar
  14. Mittelstaedt H (1983a) The role of multimodal convergence in homing by path integration. Fortschr Zool 28:197–212Google Scholar
  15. Mittelstaedt H (1983b) Introduction into cybernetics of orientation behavior. In: Hoppe W, Lohmann W, Markl H, Ziegler H (eds) Biophysics. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, pp 794–801Google Scholar
  16. Mittelstaedt H, Mittelstaedt M-L (1973) Mechanismen der Orientierung ohne richtende Außenreize. Fortschr Zool 21:46–58Google Scholar
  17. Moller P (1970) Die systematischen Abweichungen bei der optischen Richtungsorientierung der Trichterspinne Agelena labyrinthica. Z Vergl Physiol 66:78–106CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Seyfarth E-A, Barth FG (1972) Compound slit sense organs on the spider leg: Mechanoreceptors involved in kinesthetic orientation. J Comp Physiol 78:176–191CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Seyfarth E-A, Hergenröder R, Ebbes H, Barth FG (1982) Idiothetic orientation of a wandering spider - compensation of detours and estimates of goal distance. Behav Ecol 11:139–148CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Wanger J (1984) Navigationsmotorik bei Trichterspinnen. Dissertation, Tech Univ MünchenGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin, Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Horst Mittelstaedt
    • 1
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für VerhaltensphysiologieSeewiesenFederal Republic of Germany

Personalised recommendations