Mitotic Cycle of Mesophyll Protoplasts

  • Y. Meyer
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

Leaf mesophyll cells are differentiated, most of their metabolic activity being concentrated on photosynthesis. In completely developed leaves these cells do not divide. As most differentiated cells, they are arrested in the Go phase of the cell cycle, i.e. they contain an amount of DNA corresponding to 2n. After isolation, mesophyll protoplasts rapidly lose their photosynthetic ability during culture and become capable of undergoing mitosis under favourable medium conditions, including the presence of auxin and cytokinin in the culture medium.

Keywords

Migration Maize Hydrate Polysaccharide Electrophoresis 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

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  • Y. Meyer

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