The Neuropsychology of Memory

  • L. R. Squire
Part of the Dahlem Workshop Reports book series (DAHLEM, volume 29)

Abstract

Neuropsychology aims to describe how the brain accomplishes learning and memory, in a way that speaks both to cognitive psychology and neuroscience. This paper presents a summary of presently available information about the neuropsychology of human memory, emphasizing three ideas: a) The neural substrate of memory continues to change for a long time after initial learning. This change (memory consolidation) is distinct from the changes underlying forgetting and involves the medial temporal region of the brain. b) The nervous system honors the distinction between two kinds of learning and memory (procedural vs. declarative). The former is spared in amnesia and does not depend on the integrity of the particular brain regions that when damaged cause amnesia. c) Animal models of human amnesia in the monkey are now available. These models should permit those brain regions damaged in amnesia to be identified and should lead to more detailed neurobiological study of these regions.

Keywords

Neurol Weinstein 

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Copyright information

© Berlin, Heildelberg, New York, Tokyo: Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. R. Squire
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Veterans Administration Medical CenterSan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.University of CaliforniaSan Diego La JollaUSA

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