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Human Learning and Memory

  • W. K. Estes
Part of the Dahlem Workshop Reports book series (DAHLEM, volume 29)

Abstract

Salient trends in the transition from animal to human learning are: a) a progressive constriction of the scope of elementary conditioning and associative learning processes and subordination of these to higher, mainly verbal, processes; and b) a greatly extended time scale for the relation between acquisition and use of information. The current practice in cognitive psychology is to study human learning wholly within an information processing framework. This strategy has yielded useful results, yet questions can be raised concerning the possible advantages of also looking at biological aspects of human information processing, especially with regard to the development of learning ability, readinesses and sensitive periods for particular forms of learning, and biological constraints on learning.

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Copyright information

© Berlin, Heildelberg, New York, Tokyo: Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. K. Estes
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Psychology and Social RelationsHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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