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Effects of Enhanced Ultraviolet-B Radiation on Yield, and Disease Incidence and Severity for Wheat Under Field Conditions

  • R. H. Biggs
  • P. G. Webb
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 8)

Abstract

The influence of enhanced UV-B radiation (280–320 nm) on wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. ‘Florida 301’) yield, and disease incidence and severity was investigated for two growing seasons under field conditions. Three levels of UV-B enhancement, simulating 8, 12, and 16% stratospheric ozone reduction, were employed during 1982, and two levels of UV-B radiation enhancement, simulating 12 and 16% ozone depletion, were used during 1983. At each level of UV-B enhancement during 1982, no significant direct effect upon yield was observed. However, in 1983, there was an indication that UV-B radiation was interacting with other parameters because there was a significant bimodal response on plant and seed dry weights. As determined by incidence survey, during 1982 the incidence of leaf rust (Puccinia recondita f. sp. tritici), leaf spot (Helminthosporium sativum), and glume blotch (Septoria nodorum) were not significantly affected by the enhanced levels of UV-B radiation. During 1983, specific small plots were used to test for leaf rust severity on a resistant and a susceptible cultivar. Leaf rust on the resistant cultivar ‘Florida 301’ decreased with plant age, but control and UV-treated plants were not different. With increased UV-B irradiation of the susceptible but tolerant cultivar ‘Red Hart’ severity increased with age, and all plots exposed to increased levels of UV-B radiation were significantly different from the control. However, these small plot tests did not allow us to determine if yield was influenced.

Keywords

Leaf Rust Enhancement Level Accelerate Aging Test Ozone Reduction Leaf Rust Severity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. H. Biggs
    • 1
  • P. G. Webb
    • 1
  1. 1.University of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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