Changes in Monitoring Methods Caused by the Use of Intelligent Bedside Equipment

  • E. Epple
  • W. Bleicher
  • M. Kopp
  • H. Junger

Abstract

The reduction in the real cost of computing power has caused bedside hardware monitors to be replaced by firmware or software systems (microprocessors). There has been some pioneering work, for example from C. Zeelenbergs group of the Thorax Center Cardiology Departments, Rotterdam. They developed the Unibox- Unibed System (Zeelenberg et al. 1977). In the meantime several commercial “intelligent bedside monitors” have been presented. With those monitors we have greater possibilities and there arises the necessity of a critical reexamination of appropriate clinical tasks for those units. Fortunately a lot of experience in the abilities of “intelligent” devices has been gained by applying minicomputers in patient monitoring (Epple et al. 1981,1983a, c: Kopp et al. 1980: Sheppard et al. 1983: Shoemaker et al. 1979).

Keywords

Beach Expense Aliasing 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Epple
  • W. Bleicher
  • M. Kopp
  • H. Junger

There are no affiliations available

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