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CBF in Patients with Ischemic Cerebrovascular Disease Studied with 133Xe Inhalation and Single Photon Emission Tomography

  • S. Vorstrup
  • N. A. Lassen

Abstract

The recent development of a three-dimensional tomographic technique for measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) of inhaled 133Xe enables accurate detection and visualization of focal low flow areas. Several measurements may be performed in individual patients and normal volunteers due to the noninvasive nature of the method and the low radiation exposure. It has therefore become possible to study the changes in regional CBF following cerebral ischemia in man, and also to evaluate the effects of medical or surgical therapy upon the cerebral circulation. Analyzing the findings obtained by this method in patients with cerebrovascular disease in conjunction with the clinical course, the angiographic lesions, and the structural findings as seen on CT scan has increased our knowledge of the sequence of pathophysiologic events occurring after cerebral ischemia. This paper aims to provide a brief description of the results in our series of patients with cerebrovascular disease, i.e., ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attacks (TIA), along with the findings following vascular surgery, studied with 133Xe inhalation and single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT).

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Full Width Half Maximum Cereb Blood Flow Hypodense Lesion Transient Ischemic Attack 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Vorstrup
    • 1
  • N. A. Lassen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyRigshospitaletCopenhagenDenmark

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