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The Prognostic Value of rCBF Measurements in Aphasic Stroke Patients

  • G. Demeurisse
  • M. Verhas
  • A. Capon

Abstract

In aphasic stroke patients, the prognosis can be deduced to a certain extent from the initial clinical assessment (severity and type of aphasia) and from CT scan data. Searching for further information concerning the prognosis, we performed rCBF studies in such patients. Resting rCBF measurements proved to have but a limited prognostic value. Only the most severely affected patients (those with total aphasia for which the prognosis was already known to be bad) could be distinguished from the others by their resting rCBF (Demeurisse et al. 1984). In the patients with a cortico-subcortical infarct, we also observed a relation between the mean CBF in the right hemisphere at rest and the final aphasiologic assessment (3 months after the stroke). This might suggest that recovery from aphasia in these cases depended on appropriate perfusion in the unaffected hemisphere (Demeurisse et al. 1982).

Keywords

Language Disorder Unaffected Hemisphere Linguistic Task Total Aphasia rCBF Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Demeurisse
    • 1
  • M. Verhas
    • 1
  • A. Capon
    • 1
  1. 1.Service de Revalidation NeurologiqueHôpital Universitaire BrugmannBrusselsBelgium

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