Neurology pp 141-143 | Cite as

The Impact of Dr. Geschwind’s Work on Neuropsychology

  • K. Poeck
Conference paper

Abstract

This session is devoted to the memory of Dr. Norman Geschwind, who was one of the three organizers of the main topic of brain and behavior. He had just completed his part of the program, which was this session on mechanisms of attention and attentional disorders, when he was struck by a massive myocardial infarction. In fact, I learned the sad news one Monday morning, and in the afternoon I received a letter from him giving the final version of the program for this session.

Keywords

Neurol Bark Aphasia Apraxia Agnosia 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Geschwind N (1962) The anatomy of acquired disorders of reading. In: Money J (ed) Reading disability. Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore, pp 115–129Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Geschwind N (1963) Carl Wernicke, the Breslau School and the history of aphasia. In: Carterette EC (ed) Brain function, vol III: Speech, language and communication. University of California Press, Berkeley, pp 1–16Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Geschwind N (1965) Disconnexion syndromes in animals and man. Brain 88: 237–294PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Geschwind N (1965) Disconnexion syndromes in animals and man. Brain 88: 585–644PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Geschwind N (1967) The apraxias. In: Straus EW, Griffith RM (ed) Phenomenology of will and action. Duquesne University Press, Pittsburgh, pp 91–102Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Geschwind N, Galaburda AM (1985) Cerebral lateralization: Biological mechanisms, associations, and pathology: I. A hypothesis and a program for research. Arch Neurol 42: 428–459PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Geschwind N, Galaburda AM (1985) Cerebral lateralization: Biological mechanisms, associations, and pathology. II. A hypothesis and a program for research. Arch Neurol 42: 521–552PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Geschwind N, Galaburda AM (1985) Cerebral lateralization: Biological mechanisms, association, and pathology. III. A hypothesis and a program for research. Arch Neurol 42: 634–654PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Geschwind N, Levitsky W (1968) Human brain: Left-right asymmetries in temporal speech region. Science 161: 186–187PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    von Stauffenberg W(1914) Über Seelenblindheit. Arb Hirnanat Inst, Zürich, H. 8Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Poeck
    • 1
  1. 1.Abteilung NeurologieMedizinische Fakultät der Technischen Hochschule AachenAachenFederal Republic of Germany

Personalised recommendations