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Alterations in Health Perception and Lifestyle in Treated Hypertensives

  • B. J. Milne
Part of the Health Systems Research book series (HEALTH)

Abstract

Several cross-sectional and longitudinal studies (Bloom & Monterossa, 1981; Monk, 1981; Mossey, 1981; Taylor et al, 1981) have demonstrated alterations in health perception, psychosocial functioning and work absenteeism in both treated and untreated but aware hypertensives. The results of these studies indicate that treatment of hypertension, and possibly knowledge of the condition alone, can have a negative impact on certain aspects of psychological and behavioural functioning. This study was undertaken to gain further knowledge of this phenomenon in the treated hypertensive patient. Specifically, it addresses two main questions: 1) What is the effect of the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension on the patient’s a) perceived state of health, b) participation in activities and c) self care behaviours related to weight, smoking and exercise; and 2) How long do these effects last?

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References

  1. Bloom, JR, & Monterossa, S. Hypertension labelling and sense of well-being. American Journal of Public Health, 1981, 71 (11): 1228–1232.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Monk, M. Blood pressure awareness and psychological well-being in the Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Clinical Investigative Medicine, 1981, 4: 183–189.Google Scholar
  3. Mossey, JM. Psychological consequences of labelling in hypertension. Clinical Investigative Medicine, 1981, 4: 201–207.Google Scholar
  4. Taylor, DW, Haynes, RB, Sackett DL & Gibson, ES. Long term follow-up of absenteeism among working men following the detection and treatment of their hypertension. Clinical Investigative Medicine, 1981, 4: 173–181.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. J. Milne
    • 1
  1. 1.School of NursingUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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