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The Effect of Chronic Thallium Administration on Testicular Enzyme Activities in the Rat

  • C. Gregotti
  • L. Formigli
  • A. Di Nucci
  • P. Poggi
  • C. Roccio
  • R. Scelsi
  • L. Manzo
  • F. Berte
Conference paper
Part of the Archives of Toxicology book series (TOXICOLOGY, volume 8)

Abstract

Selected enzyme activities were investigated in adult Wistar rats given 10 ppm thallium as the sulphate in the drinking water. The activity of β-glucuronidase, an enzyme primarily located in Sertoli cells and spermatogonia, was significantly reduced after 60 days of treatment with thallium whereas the activity of acid phosphatase (an ubiquitous testicular enzyme) did not differ from that of controls. Thallium did not affect food and water consumption, absolute and relative weight of testes, testicular protein content or the plasma levels of testosterone over the 60-day period of treatment. It is suggested that disorders in energy metabolism primarily involving Sertoli cells may, at least in part, account for the abnormal testicular biochemistry in thallium treated rats.

Key words

Testis β-Glucuronidase Thallium Toxicity Rat 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Gregotti
    • 1
  • L. Formigli
    • 2
  • A. Di Nucci
    • 1
  • P. Poggi
    • 3
  • C. Roccio
    • 2
  • R. Scelsi
    • 3
  • L. Manzo
    • 2
  • F. Berte
    • 1
  1. 1.II Institute of PharmacologyUniversity of Pavia Medical SchoolPaviaItaly
  2. 2.Chair of ToxicologyUniversity of Pavia Medical SchoolPaviaItaly
  3. 3.Institute of PathologyUniversity of Pavia Medical SchoolPaviaItaly

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