Advertisement

Lack of Substantial Neuroendocrine Changes in Short-Term High Dose Cadmium treated Rats

  • G. De Natale
  • A. Lucisano
  • S. Damiano
  • D. Capone
  • G. Basile
Conference paper
Part of the Archives of Toxicology book series (TOXICOLOGY, volume 8)

Abstract

A 35-day cadmium (Cd) 5 mg/kg/day treatment, by oral gavage did not modify adrenal cortex, Leydig cells, thyroid function or autacoid 5-hydroxytryptamine peripheral metabolism but it increased urinary catecholamine excretion and decreased hypothalamic 5-hydroxytryptamine levels. Remarkable Cd concentrations were found at the renal and adrenal level, thymus and spleen on a decreasing scale. Cd brain and testicular concentrations did not change, neither were their histological features appreciable modified. Renal tissue showed marked degenerative changes. The increase in catecholamine excretion may indicate an activation of chromaffin tissue and peripheral adrenergic neurotransmission. Hypothalamic 5-hydroxytryptamine changes focus attention on possible subtle changes of neurotransmitters of the median eminence area, involved in the pituitary control, with a blood-brain barrier more permeable than other areas of the brain.

Key words

Cadmium Neuroendocrine effects Adrenal cortex Brain Serotonin Catecholamines 

References

  1. Anania V., Desole S., Esposito G., Sama Randaccio F., Miele E. (1983) Levels of monoamines in different regions of the rat brain in heavy metal toxicosis. Presented at the 24th Congress of the European Society of Toxicology, Arch. Toxicol. Suppl. 7, in press.Google Scholar
  2. Arvidson B. (1981) Is cadmium toxic to the nervous system? Trends in neurol. Sci. 4, pp XI-XIV.Google Scholar
  3. Givener M.L., Rochefort J.G. (1965) An improved assay of corticosterone in rat serum and adrenal tissue. Steroids 6, 45–49.Google Scholar
  4. FAO-OMS Commité mixte d’experts des additives alimentaires XVI Rapport Genève avril 4–12 1972.Google Scholar
  5. Lauwerys R. (1979) Cadmium in man. In: Webb M. (ed.) The chemistry, biochemistry and biology of cadmium, Elsevier North Holland Biomedical press, Amsterdam, pp. 433–455.Google Scholar
  6. Parizek J., Zahor Z. (1956) Effect of cadmium salts on testicular tissue. Nature 177, 1036–1037.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Scapagnini U., Vandenbroeck R., De Schaepdryver A. (1969) Simultaneous estimation of 5-hydroxytryptamine and 5-hydroxyindol-3-acetic acid in the rat brain. Biochem. Pharmacol. 18,938–940CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. De Natale
    • 1
  • A. Lucisano
    • 2
  • S. Damiano
    • 3
  • D. Capone
    • 1
  • G. Basile
    • 4
  1. 1.Dept. of Pharmacology, 2nd Medical FacultyNaples UniversityItaly
  2. 2.Chair of Veterinary Toxicology, Veterinary FacultyNaples UniversityItaly
  3. 3.Chair of Pathology, Veterinary FacultyNaples UniversityItaly
  4. 4.Agrarian Chemistry, Faculty of AgrarianNaples UniversityItaly

Personalised recommendations