The Qualitative and Quantitative Determination of Juvenile Hormones by Mass Spectrometry

  • B. Mauchamp
  • M. Zander
  • R. Wolff
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

In order to understand the endocrinology regulation of insect morphogenesis and reproduction, an accurate and precise method of measuring juvenile hormone (JH) titers at different stages of the insect life cycle is necessary. This is not a simple matter due to the very low concentrations of these substances in insect tissue or fluids (10-7 to 10-9 M), and also to the simultaneous presence of large amounts of potentially interfering contaminants in the form of other endogenous organic substances.

Keywords

Methane Ethyl Filtration Hexane Acetonitrile 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Slámà K, Romanuk M, Sorm F (1974) Insect hormones and bioanalogues. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New YorkGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Baehr JC, Caruelle JP, Porcheron P, Cassier P (1981) In: Pratt GE, Brooks GT (eds) Juvenile hormone biochemistry. Elsevier, AmsterdamGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Strambi C, Strambi A, De Reggi ML, Hirn MH, Delaage MA (1981) Eur J Biochem 118:401PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Porcheron P, Papillon M, Baehr JC (1982) Experientia 38(8):970CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    See for example remarky by Bergot, Schooley, and de Kort (1981) in their article. In: Experientia 37 (8): 909Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    It is more correct to speak of ‘mass-to-charge ratio’, but since we are speaking of singly charged ions only, the term ‘mass’ is preferred here for simplicityGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    The use of a carrier is desirable because very small amounts of JH have a tendency to get ‘lost’ by irreversible adsorption to various substrates during workup proceduresGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    See for example the article by Ende M, Spiteller G (1982) Contaminants in mass spectrometry. Mass Spectrom 1:29CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Bieber MA, Sweeley CC, Faulkner DJ, Petersen MR (1972) Anal Biochem 47:264PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Lanzrein B, Hashimoto M, Parmakovich V, Nakanishi K, Wilhelm R, Lüscher M (1975) Life Sci 16:1271PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Mauchamp B, Lafont R, Jourdain D (1979) J Insect Physiol 25:545CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Mauchamp B, Lafont R, Hardy M, Jourdain D (1979) Biomed Mass Spectrom 6 (7):276CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Mauchamp B, Lafont R, Pennetier JL, Doumas J (1981) In: Sehnal F, Zabra A, Menn JJ, Cymborowski B (eds) Regulation of insect development and behaviour, part 1. Tech Univ Wroclaw Press, Wroclaw, PolandGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Mauchamp B, Lafont R, Krien P (1981) In: Pratt GE, Brooks GJ (eds) Juvenile hormone biochemistry. Elsevier, AmsterdamGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Rembold H, Hagenguth H, Rascher J (1980) Anal Biochem 101:356PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Rembold H (1981) In: Pratt GE, Brooks GT (eds) Juvenile hormone biochemistry. Elsevier, AmsterdamGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Bergot BJ, Ratcliff M, Schooley DA (1981) J Chromatogr 204:231CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Bergot BJ, Baker FC, Cerf DC, Jamieson G, Schooley DA (1981) In: Pratt GE, Brooks GT (eds) Juvenile hormone biochemistry. Elsevier, AmsterdamGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Edwards JP, Bergot BJ, Staal GB (1983) J Insect Physiol 29(1):83CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Temim G, Zander M, Wolff R (in preparation)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Mauchamp
    • 1
  • M. Zander
    • 2
  • R. Wolff
    • 3
  1. 1.Lab. PhytopharmacieINRAVersaillesFrance
  2. 2.Algonquin CollegeOttawaCanada
  3. 3.Lab. Chimie Org. Substances NaturallesStrasbourgFrance

Personalised recommendations