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Superoxide Dismutase and Reduced Glutathione: Possible Defenses Operating in Hyperoxic Swimbladder of Fish

  • V. Calabrese
  • F. Guerrera
  • M. Avitabile
  • M. Fama
  • V. Rizza
Conference paper
Part of the Proceedings in Life Sciences book series (LIFE SCIENCES)

Abstract

Swimbladders of fish represent an example of gaseous environment in which the oxygen pressure significantly exceeds 1 bar (Haldane and Priestly 1935). While exposure of whole fish to oxygen partial pressures as great as their swimbladders results in oxygen poisoning, swimbladders appear to be insensitive to oxygen toxicity.

Keywords

Superoxide Dismutase Xanthine Oxidase Oxygen Toxicity Total Lipid Extract Hexose Monophosphate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. Calabrese
    • 1
  • F. Guerrera
    • 2
  • M. Avitabile
    • 1
  • M. Fama
    • 1
  • V. Rizza
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Biological ChemistryUniversity of CataniaCataniaItaly
  2. 2.Institute of PharmaceuticalUniversity of CataniaCataniaItaly

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