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Activation of the c-myc Oncogene in B and T Lymphoid Tumors

  • Suzanne Cory
  • Steven Gerondakis
  • Lynn M. Corcoran
  • Ora Bernard
  • Elizabeth Webb
  • Jerry M. Adams
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 113)

Abstract

The cellular myc protio-oncogene, which is homologous to the transforming gene of the acute avian retrovirus MC29, is strongly implicated in the development of B lymphomas. Most murine plasmacytomas and human Burkitt lymphomas display translocations now known to represent recombination of the cellular mc gene with the immunoglobulin heavy chain constant region (CH) locus. Since the findings by several groups that led to this important conclusion have been reviewed recently by Klein (1983), Perry (1983), and Leder et al. (1983), we will limit discussion here to our own recent data concerning the nature of the recombination event and its consequences for c-myc transcription. We also present evidence that c-myc can participate in oncogenesis within the T as well as the B lymphoid lineage.

Keywords

Long Terminal Repeat Burkitt Lymphoma Lymphoid Tumor Switch Region Avian Leukosis Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suzanne Cory
    • 1
  • Steven Gerondakis
    • 1
  • Lynn M. Corcoran
    • 1
  • Ora Bernard
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Webb
    • 1
  • Jerry M. Adams
    • 1
  1. 1.Molecular Biology Unit, The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Post OfficeRoyal Melbourne HospitalVictoriaAustralia

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