Interleukin 3 Dependent Retrovirus Induced Lymphomas: Loss of the Ability to Terminally Differentiate in Response to Differentiation Factors

  • J. N. Ihle
  • H. C. MorseIII
  • J. Keller
  • K. L. Holmes
Part of the Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology book series (CT MICROBIOLOGY, volume 113)

Abstract

The mechanisms by which murine retroviruses induce lymphomas are largely unknown. A number of requirements have been defined which play an essential role. In Moloney leukemia virus (MoLV) induced leukemia, one potential component is an immune response (Lee and Ihle, 1981; Lee and Ihle, 1981). This has been speculated to be due to a requirement to generate an appropriate target cell population, which is accomplished by viral antigen-induced production of several lymphokines by antigen-specific helper T cells. These lymphokines subsequently induce the proliferation and differentiation of a variety of cell types. As a consequence of the acute viremia and the presence of antigen-specific helper T cells, the frequency of cells proliferating to T cell-derived lymphokines is 50- to 200-fold higher than in control mice. It is from this expanded population that the lymphomas ultimately arise (Pepersack et al., 1980).

Keywords

Lymphoma Leukemia Sarcoma Histamine Sorting 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin · Heidelberg 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. N. Ihle
    • 1
  • H. C. MorseIII
    • 2
  • J. Keller
    • 1
  • K. L. Holmes
    • 2
  1. 1.NCI-Frederick Cancer Research FacilityLBI-Basic Research ProgramFrederickUSA
  2. 2.National Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesLaboratory of Viral DiseasesBethesdaUSA

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